Issue 5.2 Index

Journalism Education issue 5-2, the journal of the Association for Journalism Education, a body representing educators in HE in the UK and Ireland. The aim of the journal is to promote and develop analysis and understanding of journalism education and of journalism, particularly when that is related to journalism education.

A Special Edition of Journalism Education – It’s the story that matters!

Introduction

This edition was guest edited by Karen Fowler-Watt, Bournemouth University, UK, she said: “I was delighted to be invited to put together this special edition of Journalism Education. It didn’t take me long to decide on a topic, since “the story”, how we tell stories and how we teach storytelling constitute dominant and consistent themes in conversations with colleagues – both in industry and the academy – as well as a personal enthusiasm.”

You can read Karen’s full introduction here

You can view or download the full journal issue here

Invited Essays

Get digital or die: News storytelling, social media and journalism education

Why words must paint pictures

Articles

Teaching and learning journalistic responsibility in the post-digital revolution

POV X 3: Helping journalism students juxtapose author, actor and audience

Storytelling in the newsroom: An investigation into practice-based learning methods in the training and employment of tomorrow’s journalists

Gamergate, fragmentary storytelling, and news narrative: Convergence, ‘conversation’, and context in journalism education

Visualising data stories together: Reflections on data journalism education

Where’s George Bush? University students weather the trauma storm of Hurricane Katrina

Reflection

Narrating Identities – Journalists and the stories of others

Book Reviews

A Classic from the journalism bookshelf: A Short Walk Down Fleet Street by Alan Watkins – Tor Clark; From the Back Page to the Front Room: Football’s journey through the English Media by Roger Domeneghetti – Mick Temple; It’s all News to Me! by Jeremy Vine – Emma Hemmingway; Enough Said: What’s gone wrong with the language of politics? By Mark Thompson – John Mair